Blogs

It's not hard to see why ballet dancers around the world have fallen in love with Yumiko's sleek leotards, which are not only stylish but also cut and constructed to flatter real dancers' bodies.

The Erik Bruhn Prize may be a quirky competition (participating dancers must come from one of the companies that Bruhn was associated with during his lifetime), but it has showcased many top dancers when they were just starting their careers.

Ever wish you could soar like American Ballet Theatre’s Jose Manuel Carreño? This summer, aspiring professionals can train with the soon-to-retire principal at Carreño Dance Festival in Sarasota, Florida, and can learn a few of his tips and tricks. 

As Web Editor, it is my happy responsibility to go to cover shoots and edit the behind-the-scenes videos that give you a glimpse of the process.  I recently edited two videos featuring two very different ballerinas, from very different places and schools.  It made me realize that contrary to the opinion of many teachers and dancers, there is no one way to move beautifully.  The ballerinas I'm talking about are NYCB principal Sterling Hyltin, and the Kirov's Yevgenia Obraztsova.  

 

Although some companies have tightened their belts over the past few years, the Princess Grace Foundation has remained a reliable source of financial support for emerging artists. Each year, the judging panel chooses five or six up-and-coming dancers to receive a Princess Grace Award.

 

It's that time of year again—audition season! The seemingly endless schedule of cattle calls and company classes can tire out even the most energetic dancer.

 

In my last few blogs, I've written about the upcoming audition season, and today, I want to address one of the most important parts of the process: Audition photos.  Most summer programs, schools and companies will ask you to bring photos of yourself in certain poses; I've seen first arabesque, developpe a la seconde, attitude croise and others requested.  The hard part, obviously, is not doing these poses, it's getting them to look good on film.

 

Injuries can be devastating to a dancer. How do you survive when you can't perform or even take class?

 

The Dancers' Resource, part of The Actor's Fund in New York City, is offering a support group for injured dancers. The eight week program, led by The Dancers' Resource social worker, offers a space for professionals to confidentially discuss the emotional issues that accompany an injury. 

 

Dates: Tuesdays, January 11 to March 1

Times: 2:00 to 3:30 pm

Location: The Actors Fund, 729 Seventh Avenue, 11th Floor

As 2010 draws to a close, many of us find ourselves looking back at the year that has passed, and looking ahead at the year to come.  It's the time to think about what you have done, and what you will do.  Regrets surface, and resolutions are formed to do better "next time".