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On Saturday night, Kanye West premiered his epic 35-minute long music video for "Runaway." When he first performed the song earlier this year at MTV's Video Music Awards, he brought a trio of ballet dancers with him onstage, so I was super curious to see how he'd incorporate dancers into his much-anticipated mini movie.

 

After years of trying to develop a beautiful line in ballet, and watching my fellow dancers try as well, my eye is trained to unconsciously look for ballet lines. I see them everywhere: in architecture and nature, in the way light plays off of buildings, in fountains and even random trash piles that resemble the famous Dying Swan pose.

If I were to create a list of top three reasons why little girls want to be ballerinas, it would probably look something like this:

 

1. Tutus

2. Tutus!

3. Did someone say "Tutus"?

 

Yesterday, Pointe's assistant editor Margaret Fuhrer asked our Facebook friends and Twitter followers a question: 

 

We love it when the world of high fashion meets the world of ballet, like Rodarte costuming the "Black Swan" stars. Which ballet classic would you like to see re-designed--and by which designer?

 

You have to wonder how much experience Petipa actually had with swans. They're elegant and graceful, yes--but they're also mean, hissy, scary even. The male swans of Matthew Bourne's wildly popular Swan Lake hit much closer to the mark, in that respect, than Petipa's tutu-clad flock. Bourne's beastly birds are seductive and arrogant--about as far from damsels in distress as you can get. Instead, they're symbols of freedom and empowerment. Bourne's Prince doesn't attempt to rescue his Swan--the Swan rescues the Prince.

Wondering about what your ideal post-dance dinner should be? Curious about which cross-training strategies are best for your body? Head to New York City Ballet's Dance Wellness Workshop tomorrow at the company's rehearsal studios in New York.

 

It is a truth universally acknolwedged among ballet students and dancers that running (or jogging) is bad, bad, bad.  Many dancers will say that running is terrible because it is pretty high-impact, meaning your joints can take a beating, and it works against you because it's a turned-in activity.  However, as a dancer who has been an amateur runner for the past six months, I say this is not necessarily true.

 

A master class can be many things: It can be a source of inspiration, a networking opportunity, the key to a new technical revelation, or simply an awesome time with an amazing dance celebrity. Manhattan Movement and Arts Center is offering a master class with the singular New York City Ballet star Wendy Whelan next Monday from 7:30 to 9 pm. She will be teaching an Intermediate/Advanced level class. The fee is $20 (or $17 professional rate). Register here.

In my last blog post, I wrote about how eagerly I was looking forward to seeing Balanchine's Serenade this past Saturday.  I was itching with anticipation.  Well, as always, it did more than not disappoint--it astounded and delighted me.  I always notice new things and details about the ballet when I see it, and that night was no exception.  But on the whole, it made me realize just how big a star the NYCB corps is in almost every Balanchine ballet, which I've mentioned before.  But now, I'm pretty much convinced that they are, collectively, the star of the