Blogs

Since 1997, American Ballet Theatre's "Make a Ballet" program has offered NYC schoolchildren the opportunity to design and produce original performance pieces.

Heads up New York dancers! Peridance Capezio Center is offering a great deal through Groupon today. For $25, you get your choice of any three classes (usually $51). Step into the studio with Alexandre Proia, Igal Perry, Graciela Kozak, or any other of the studio's great ballet teachers.

 

Last night I went to see New York City Ballet, which is coming to the end of "Balanchine Black and White Week", celebrating the choreographer's black and white leotard ballets.  On the program was Episodes, Le Tombeau de Couperin, and Symphony in Three Movements.  Awesome lineup.

 

Do you work in the dance field in New York City? Help Dance/NYC's Junior Committee figure out how to serve you best. They just launched a census to gather research on the hurdles and contributions of people ages 21–35 who work in dance.

 

No matter how beautiful they are, every dancer eventually takes a final bow. But what happens once they've given up performing?

 

In a previous blog, called "Tutu Torture", I wrote about how magical ballet costumes are, and how they are often the first things that make little girls (and sometimes boys) want to dance.  However, we love to wear them, and one of the things dancers love most about performing is, arguably, wearing a costume.  But what is it about costumes, anyway?  Why do we love them so much, even though they sometimes get in the way of our dancing? (Ahem, TUTUS, I'm looking at you).

 

In ballet, there's no such thing as perfection—especially when it comes to bodies. In our April/May issues we spoke to top dancers and directors about how shape and size affect their casting in Too Fat? Too Thin? Too Tall? Tall Short? "So You Think You Can Dance's" Melissa Sandvig opened up about being put on weight probation and being chided for eating a banana because it had too many calories.

As a dancer, it's easy to think that all you'll ever need is the music and the mirror. But in a career that depends on your body, you need to have a Plan B, no matter how talented you are.

 

On Monday night, "Dance Against Cancer" raised over $25,000 for the American Cancer Society. The event, held at Manhattan Movement & Arts Center, was co-produced by Daniel Ulbricht, whose mother is currently battling uterine cancer. It featured several of Ulbricht’s fellow New York City Ballet dancers, along with "So You Think You Can Dance" star Alex Wong and members of Keigwin + Company, Lar Lubovich Dance Company and more. The evening was driven by a strong sense of purpose: We learned during an introductory film that each participant had been touched by cancer in some way.

Senior editor Jenny Stahl recently called New York City Ballet principal Daniel Ulbricht "Superman," and I can't think of a better way to describe the phenomenally talented dancer and teacher, who seems to be everywhere at once these days. (We recently posted a poll asking who your favorite dancer-teacher was, and Ulbricht cleaned up.)