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After years of trying to develop a beautiful line in ballet, and watching my fellow dancers try as well, my eye is trained to unconsciously look for ballet lines. I see them everywhere: in architecture and nature, in the way light plays off of buildings, in fountains and even random trash piles that resemble the famous Dying Swan pose.

If I were to create a list of top three reasons why little girls want to be ballerinas, it would probably look something like this:

 

1. Tutus

2. Tutus!

3. Did someone say "Tutus"?

 

Yesterday, Pointe's assistant editor Margaret Fuhrer asked our Facebook friends and Twitter followers a question: 

 

We love it when the world of high fashion meets the world of ballet, like Rodarte costuming the "Black Swan" stars. Which ballet classic would you like to see re-designed--and by which designer?

 

You have to wonder how much experience Petipa actually had with swans. They're elegant and graceful, yes--but they're also mean, hissy, scary even. The male swans of Matthew Bourne's wildly popular Swan Lake hit much closer to the mark, in that respect, than Petipa's tutu-clad flock. Bourne's beastly birds are seductive and arrogant--about as far from damsels in distress as you can get. Instead, they're symbols of freedom and empowerment. Bourne's Prince doesn't attempt to rescue his Swan--the Swan rescues the Prince.

Wondering about what your ideal post-dance dinner should be? Curious about which cross-training strategies are best for your body? Head to New York City Ballet's Dance Wellness Workshop tomorrow at the company's rehearsal studios in New York.

 

It is a truth universally acknolwedged among ballet students and dancers that running (or jogging) is bad, bad, bad.  Many dancers will say that running is terrible because it is pretty high-impact, meaning your joints can take a beating, and it works against you because it's a turned-in activity.  However, as a dancer who has been an amateur runner for the past six months, I say this is not necessarily true.

 

A master class can be many things: It can be a source of inspiration, a networking opportunity, the key to a new technical revelation, or simply an awesome time with an amazing dance celebrity. Manhattan Movement and Arts Center is offering a master class with the singular New York City Ballet star Wendy Whelan next Monday from 7:30 to 9 pm. She will be teaching an Intermediate/Advanced level class. The fee is $20 (or $17 professional rate). Register here.

In my last blog post, I wrote about how eagerly I was looking forward to seeing Balanchine's Serenade this past Saturday.  I was itching with anticipation.  Well, as always, it did more than not disappoint--it astounded and delighted me.  I always notice new things and details about the ballet when I see it, and that night was no exception.  But on the whole, it made me realize just how big a star the NYCB corps is in almost every Balanchine ballet, which I've mentioned before.  But now, I'm pretty much convinced that they are, collectively, the star of the

There's not a single ballet dancer I know who doesn't have a love/hate affair with her pointe shoes. Her artistry depends on her shoes never letting her down. But while they can give her the strength and support to find freedom onstage, if she doesn't have the right fit or doesn't understand how to use them, her shoes will simply be an endless source of blisters, bruised toenails, Achilles tendonitis and more.