Suzannah Friscia's blog

When you're rushing to the studio for your morning class, it can be tempting to skip breakfast. But a recent study published in the Nutrition Journal found that eating breakfast may help to reduce food cravings and make you less likely to overeat later in the day.

When you're dreading an especially rough day at the studio or a challenging performance, improving your mood could be as simple as changing the way you walk. A recent study published in the Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry found that subjects who walked in a more depressed style (with shoulders rolled forward and less arm movement) experienced worse moods than those who walked in a "happier," more upbeat style.  

Struggling to hone your interpretation of a new role? You may want to reach for some fruit. Many fruits, like bananas and peaches, are high in the amino acid tyrosine, and according to a recent study published in Psychological Research, foods with high tyrosine levels may help us to think harder and more creatively.

Apple picking season is here, making it that much easier to find a healthy snack when you're on the go. Apples are full of fiber and nutrients, and research (detailed in a recent Shape magazine article) shows that they can improve your body's overall health. With thousands of varieties to choose from, each with its own individual flavor and nutritional perks, you can enjoy them all autumn long.

Here are a few dancer-friendly varieties to get you started:

Exciting things are underfoot at American Ballet Theatre as they begin their 75th anniversary season. But this week brought bittersweet news: Three of their principal dancers have announced their retirements. Paloma Herrera, Julie Kent and Xiomara Reyes will retire at the end of ABT's 2015 season in New York City.

In case you need another reason to reach for fruits and vegetables when you're packing your dance bag, new research conducted by the University of Warwick's Medical School found these foods could be just as good for your mental health as they are for your physical health.

You already know about the importance of healthy fats. And using oils in your cooking (in moderation) can be a good way to reap the benefits without overdoing it.

There's one thing we know about dance clothes: After even one class or rehearsal, they get sweaty faster than anything else in your closet. But synthetic materials like polyester, often found in dance and fitness clothing, tend to smell worse (and stink even faster) after exercise than other materials like cotton.

Can money buy happiness? A recent study found that maybe it can—if you're buying an experience. Researchers at Cornell University and University of California, Berkeley, surveyed around 100 college students and more than 2,200 randomly chosen adults to see how they felt while waiting to purchase both material goods and entry to events.

We all know that a cup of coffee can provide a much-needed energy boost during a long day of dance. And several studies from the past few months have reiterated that caffeine can improve athletes' performance in endurance activities. According to research from St. Mary's University in the UK, the thought is that caffeine increases the frequency or size of neural transmissions and helps to suppress pain.