Director’s Notes: Old-Fashioned Innovator

Ballet Austin’s Stephen Mills stretches his dancers and his audiences. On the brink of insanity, Hamlet struggles with three alter-egos in a sequence that blends balletic precision with modern dance elasticity. By fusing the timeless with the contemporary,  Ballet Austin’s 2000 production of Shakespeare’s classic cemented the company’s reputation for bringing form-breaking movement to old-fashionedMore »

Director’s Notes: Unafraid to Explore

Louis Robitaille has put BJM Danse Montréal at theforefront of all that’s edgy and cool in contemporary ballet. Athletic, versatile and physically beautiful, the dancers of BJM Danse Montréal, formerly Les Ballets Jazz de Montréal, have dazzled audiences worldwide for more than 35 years. Yet there was a time when the troupe fought to beMore »

Director’s Notes: Something Old, Something New

The Washington Ballet’s Septime Webre keeps an eye on the past and the future. In a company as small as The Washington Ballet, dancers don’t get lost in the corps. With just 20 members and two apprentices, artists perform frequently and get plenty of opportunities to dance solos and leading roles. They also work onMore »

Director’s Notes: A New Classicism

The National Ballet of Canada’s Karen Kain On a sunny fall morning, in a large, bright studio filled with Tchaikovsky, Karen Kain sits intently watching rehearsal. Now in her fifth season as artistic director of the National Ballet of Canada, Kain has an eagle eye. When it comes to the company’s opulent production of RudolfMore »

Director’s Notes: Going Global

Tulsa Ballet’s Marcello Angelini builds an international troupe in the heart of Oklahoma. At first glance, the 28 members of Tulsa Ballet seemed to vanish, chameleon-like, into their roles when they performed last August at New York City’s Joyce Theater. Had principal Karina Gonzalez, so jaunty in Kenneth MacMillan’s fizzy Elite Syncopations, been swallowed upMore »