Ballerina and Health Coach: Carolyn’s Veggie Tacos

They say injury can be a great teacher: When Texas Ballet Theater dancer Carolyn Judson was sidelined with a back injury in 2007, her interest in health piqued. “I wondered how I could heal myself, so I began to research and read,” she says. “I was amazed at what I found. I turned to foodMore »

Juice Cleansing: Smart Detox or Drastic Diet?

Like many dancers, New York City Ballet soloist Antonio Carmena is constantly looking for ways to help his body run more efficiently. After watching a documentary about juice cleansing this March, Carmena decided to try his own three-day version during the last week of the company’s season. “I wasn’t trying to lose weight,” he says.More »

Ask Amy: Reaching Your Healthy Weight

Have a question? Click here to send it to Pointe editor and former dancer Amy Brandt.   At my last checkup my doctor said I needed to gain weight. I’m 91 pounds and 5′ 3″. I understand the health risks of being underweight, especially since I’m 17 and haven’t gotten my period yet, but I likeMore »

Running Stabilizes Your Appetite

Want to keep your appetite in check? Start running. Even though exercise often makes us hungrier, certain types of workouts appear to increase hormones that cue us stop eating once our bodies have enough fuel. A study done at the University of Wyoming last year found that after walking, women overate, consuming more calories than they had burned.

Real Life Dance: Eat To Dance

With so much information on nutrition out there, deciding on what constitutes a healthy diet can be a little confusing, especially for dancers who need to consume enough food to fuel a day of dancing. The effect of too little nourishment can become evident early in the day, says Marie Elena Scioscia, a Manhattan nutritionistMore »

Dancers’ Top 5 Food Mistakes

Pointe spoke with Roberta Anding, sports dietitian for Houston Ballet, about the biggest nutrition mistakes dancers don’t realize they’re making. 1. Being afraid of foods that are filling or cause temporary bloating. Nutrient-dense, moderate-calorie foods, such as broth-based soups, fruits, vegetables, skim milk and yogurt, will actually help keep hunger at bay. (Limit milk, however,More »

Even Happier Holidays

Gobble down your Thanksgiving feast guilt-free this year. Researchers from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, recently found that women who performed moderate-intensity cardio exercise before overeating actually increased their metabolism. Instead of turning into love handles, the calories were used to refuel their muscles. So while the turkey is cooking in the oven, hitMore »