Studio to Street: Céline Cassone

What is Céline Cassone’s favorite thing to buy? Cowboy boots, to add to her growing collection. “I’m just crazy with boots,” the Les Ballets Jazz de Montréal dancer says. “Always the same style, some short and some longer.” It’s also the one part of her outfit where you might find a pop of color, asMore »

Studio to Street: Simone Messmer

Don’t expect to catch Simone Messmer wearing a leotard—at least, not for company class. “Ballet class is for me,” she says. “It happens every day, so it turns into a major part of how you set yourself up for the day and how you’re feeling. I think it’s really important to take control of that.”More »

Studio to Street: James Whiteside

When it comes to style, James Whiteside likes to push the limits. “Conforming isn’t really my thing,” says the American Ballet Theatre principal. He chooses pieces that express his personality, while always leaving room to experiment with new ideas. “I haven’t really married myself to one aesthetic, and that gives me a lot of options,”More »

Courtney Lavine is the Face of Avon’s New Fragrance

We love it when the rest of the world gets inspired by ballet—especially when they recognize dancers as the powerful athletes and intelligent artists that we know they are. Through collaborations like Misty Copeland‘s recent commercial for Dannon’s Oikos Greek yogurt and New York City Ballet’s new partnership with PUMA, ballet dancers are popping upMore »

Studio to Street: Dores André

Dores André doesn’t like shopping, but she loves clothes. Her favorite source of style inspiration is the 1964 comedy What a Way to Go!, starring Shirley MacLaine and a closet of over-the-top costumes. “It’s just crazy—she wears, like, thousands and thousands of outfits,” André says. “I wish I owned every single piece in that movie.”More »

Dancer Spotlight: Elizabeth Murphy

On any given day, Pacific Northwest Ballet’s rehearsal studios are filled with ballerinas decked out in a rainbow of colorful, innovative leotards—many designed and hand-sewn by principal dancer Elizabeth Murphy. Murphy didn’t grow up sewing. In fact, she didn’t even know how to run a sewing machine until she was 18. She didn’t want toMore »