Three Things to Expect From Your First Pair of Pointe Shoes

Just promoted onto pointe? Learn how to make the healthiest choices when it comes to your very first pair of shoes. Enjoy this second video from master shoe fitter Josephine Lee of the California-based The Pointe Shop below.   For more news on all things ballet, don’t miss a single issue.

Five Reasons Why You Should Get a Professional Pointe Shoe Fitting

We know how hard it can be to find the right pair of pointe shoes, but thanks to master pointe shoe fitter Josephine Lee, founder of the California-based The Pointe Shop, we’re here to help you. Over the course of the summer we’ll be releasing a series of videos with Lee to help you through every step of theMore »

Get All Your Pointe Shoe Questions Answered at School at Steps’ Workshop

Even if you’ve been wearing pointe shoes for years, chances are you have some questions. There are so many variables at play when it comes to finding the right shoe and making sure you’re training safely. The School at Steps has got you covered. Next Sunday, April 30, they’ll host The Pointe Shoe Workshop &More »

Maintaining Motivation

Coming home from my summer intensive was such a letdown. How can I carry my summer inspiration into the fall? —Hailey I remember the feeling, too. After weeks of intense dancing, exciting master teachers and new friends, it can be hard to go back home. You have to channel that inspired energy back into yourMore »

Confessions of a Pointe Shoe Fitter

For many dancers, the quest for the perfect pointe shoe is a long one, littered with years’ worth of rejected makes and models. With countless options out there, how should you navigate the many brands and trends to find your ideal pair? We spoke with Nadia Randall, general manager and fitting specialist at The ShoeMore »

The Great Pointe Debate

As a pre-professional dancer, you need training that will help you transition as smoothly as possible into the rigorous environment of a professional ballet company. Among other considerations, that means developing strong and seamless pointework. Chances are, you’re spending a lot of your classes and rehearsal time in pointe shoes right now. That said, thereMore »

Expert Pointe Shoe Fitter Starts YouTube Channel

We’ve all tried to find the best way to three-quarter pointe shoes. Now, Mary Carpenter, a professional fitter based in New York City, has launched DancewithmaryNYC, a YouTube channel dedicated to answering pointe shoe-related questions. Besides having over 20 years of pointe shoe fitting experience, Carpenter is also a ballet teacher, a Pilates mat instructor and a former dancer who worked with David Howard for 23 years.

 

The Birth of Gaynor Minden

Dancers have a love-hate relationship with their pointe shoes. They give us blisters, make our feet throb and don’t last very long—but if anyone tried to take them away, we’d chase them off with a stick.

 

So when former dancer Eliza Gaynor Minden took a closer look at traditional pointe shoe brands and noticed where improvements could be made, she jumped at the chance to develop a high-tech pointe shoe under the label Gaynor Minden.

 

Get A Grip: The Latest Pointe Shoe Innovation

Is it time your pointe shoes had a makeover? Gordon Waddington thinks so. A professor of physiotherapy at Australia’s University of Canberra, Waddington is developing an insole that will give dancers extra “grip” in their pointe shoes. It’s made from textured PVC material that has a lined pattern so that it locks onto the skin. The hope is that giving dancers more control in their pointe shoes will help prevent ankle and leg injuries. Students at the Australian Ballet School are currently testing it out during their barrework over the course of an 11-week trial.

Pointe Shoe Pointers

As a teenager, I’d spend hours at a time trying on pointe shoes at San Francisco Dancewear. The search for the perfect fit felt as elusive as Ponce de León’s Fountain of Youth. I really had no concrete idea what I was looking for, other than something that made my feet look good and didn’t hurt—too much.